February 20, 2009

Forever Young

In mid-2001, when Alex Rodriguez says he and his cousin were beginning to act "young and stupid", A-Rod was 26 and Yuri Sucart was 38 (he's 46 now). They continued being "pretty naive and pretty young" for (at least) another three years.

***

More A-Roid lies, according to ESPNdeportes.com:
According to the official in charge of the agency which regulates pharmaceutical drugs in the Dominican Republic, Primobolan was not available for legal purchase, over-the-counter or with a prescription in his country between 2001 and 2003.

Dr. Pia Veras, who oversees the regulatory agency, told ESPNdeportes.com that Primobolan is known as "boli" in the streets of Dominican Republic, and was not legal for purchase during the aforementioned years.

"What Alex Rodriguez stated at the press conference [in Tampa] doesn't make sense," Veras said. "It is important for us to clarify that such substance has not been registered and is not currently registered for legal sale in Dominican pharmacies -- not now and the same applies for the years 2001 to 2003." ...

Veras allowed ESPNdeportes.com to check the official records of the agency, which oversees, monitors and tracks the pharmaceutical inventory that is legally sold in the Dominican Republic. ...

"No pharmacy carries this product; no pharmacy has this product as registered in its inventory," said [Dr. Milton Pinedo, president of the Dominican Federation of Sports Medicine] ... "You can get this but you have to go to the underground market."

15 comments:

9casey said...

None of this makes a difference , he still is going to make 400 billion dollars, and still be able to play baseball, why do they continue to dig, can he go to jail? , can he be banned forever? Most likely not, so why bother??????

seawolvesfan said...

5'6" tallest in my family. EFFING A 38 degrees here yesterday and were having our 2nd mini breakup which sucks but hey time to walk around town with your shirt off its so hot. screw a-roid

Benjamin said...

so why bother??????

What else is there to talk about? How the Sox are not rescheduling their home opener because of Passover?

L-girl said...

Most likely not, so why bother??????

Don't you folks who care about steroids use want to see MLB do something about it?

You seriously want them to say "why bother" and walk away?

I'm in the Don't Care camp, so I'm not one to ask.

andy said...

They are digging so they can keep the heat on the 103 others on that list. That is the real gold mine that all media outlets are chasing. That would be huge to crack the mystery. I think ESPN should get the names and then do a countdown special. They could show the 100 most interesting players of the past 10 years and not mention the drugs. Then at the end they could say, "surprise all these guys are on the positive list." That would be epic in proportion. Would really beat to death the issue and we could all finally move feeling justified in the slandering of players. I for one feel we should hold the players accountable. IT was the roids that turned the Sosa McGwire thing into the spectacle that it was. Bods too. All these things caused ticket prices to go through the roof and parks sell out so you have to buy them at 3 times the face value from resellers. IF anything bad at all came from this it was that.

9casey said...

if the list contains a 103 no names with more than 80%of minor leaguers, the list turns into garbage and not the holy grail......whatever, I am bored with this he still a class "A" moron

redsock said...

It's a total grey area. Why is one treatment -- HGH -- illegal and another one -- like coristone or lasic surgery -- not? (Why is pot illegal while booze, which is much more destructive, legal?)

A couple of days ago, the Times reported on a procedure called "platelet-rich plasma therapy ... [which] could eventually improve the treatment of stubborn injuries like tennis elbow and knee tendinitis for athletes of all types".

***

"The method, which is strikingly straightforward and easy to perform, centers on injecting portions of a patient's blood directly into the injured area, which catalyzes the body's instincts to repair muscle, bone and other tissue. Most enticing, many doctors said, is that the technique appears to help regenerate ligament and tendon fibers, which could shorten rehabilitation time and possibly obviate surgery. ...

"Dr. Neal ElAttrache, the Los Angeles Dodgers' team physician, used platelet-rich plasma therapy in July on a partially torn ulnar collateral ligament in the throwing elbow of pitcher Takashi Saito. Surgery would have ended Mr. Saito's season and shelved him for about 10 to 14 months; he instead returned to pitch in the September pennant race without pain.

"Dr. ElAttrache said he could not be certain that the procedure caused the pitcher's recovery — about 25 percent of such cases heal on their own, he said — but it was another encouraging sign for the nascent technique, which doctors in the field said could help not just injuries to professional athletes but the tendinitis and similar ailments found in the general population. ...

"Platelet-rich plasma is derived by placing a small amount of the patient's blood in a filtration system or centrifuge that rotates at high speed, separating red blood cells from the platelets that release proteins and other particles involved in the body's self-healing process, doctors said. A teaspoon or two of the remaining substance is then injected into the damaged area. The high concentration of platelets — from 3 to 10 times that of normal blood — often catalyzes the growth of new soft-tissue or bone cells. Because the substance is injected where blood would rarely go otherwise, it can deliver the healing instincts of platelets without triggering the clotting response for which platelets are typically known.

""This could be a method to stimulate wound healing in areas that are not well-vascularized, like ligaments and tendons," said Dr. Gerjo van Osch, a researcher in the department of orthopedics at Erasmus University Medical Center in the Netherlands. "I call it a growth-factor cocktail — that's how I explain it.""

****

9casey said...

redsock said...


A couple of days ago, the Times reported on a procedure called "platelet-rich plasma therapy ...


I believe Hines Ward used this same thing to play in the super bowl....Why did you post this.....are you saying there are similarities to this and HGH?

L-girl said...

Q:

Why did you post this.....are you saying there are similarities to this and HGH?

A:

Why is one treatment -- HGH -- illegal and another one -- like cortisone or lasic surgery -- not? (Why is pot illegal while booze, which is much more destructive, legal?)

Benjamin said...

Why is one treatment -- HGH -- illegal and another one -- like cortisone or lasic surgery -- not?

I'm pretty sure it has to do with the relative political clout of the liquified dog testicle lobby.

9casey said...

redsock said...
It's a total grey area. Why is one treatment -- HGH -- illegal and another one -- like coristone or lasic surgery -- not? (Why is pot illegal while booze, which is much more destructive, legal?)


If they could come up with a test to see if you were smoking pot while driving .I believe pot would be legal......

L-girl said...

If they could come up with a test to see if you were smoking pot while driving .I believe pot would be legal......

No way. If some major corporation with government connections could take over the entire marijuana trade, get billions of dollars in no-bid contracts, and kick back millions to a few well-place elected officials, then maybe pot would be legal.

andy said...

I will run the whole operation and make sure all the right people get paid. Just so long as I can distribute pot to the country legally. I would take a modest income and donate all profits beyond payroll to charities and political campaigns. We could employ tens of thousands of people across the country. It could shift the centers of power to lower income rural areas where the farms would be. I think it would be a great thing for america. We could supply the world and eliminate the need for the violent crime mobs that currently run the operation. Shit Canada would have to follow suit and they have seriously huge supply possibilities. We could even rejuvenate Mexico's agricultural industry. All you have to do is charge as much for weed as you would for fine wine. Most of the price will be made up of various taxes. Wow that is off topic. I would trade places with Arod right now. I couldn't play any worse. Relative to the expectations placed on me and on him.

9casey said...

Isn't there someone here from California, It's practically legal there now anyway...Get a card from your Dr. and you get some of the finest weed produced.....


And it truly wouldn't be capitalism if the gov't wasn't behind it all....

Make sports gambling leagal at your local 7-11 as well ..anyone of us could go online and place a bet, but God forbid you get caught with a bookie....

L-girl said...

Isn't there someone here from California, It's practically legal there now anyway...

Bit of an exaggeration, I think. People say the same about Canada, also not true.

Zen and Andy are both in California.

Shit Canada would have to follow suit and they have seriously huge supply possibilities. We could even rejuvenate Mexico's agricultural industry. All you have to do is charge as much for weed as you would for fine wine. Most of the price will be made up of various taxes. Wow that is off topic.

But interesting! Let me know when you go live, I want in.