November 4, 2010

Google Content Blocker

About Google Content Blocker
What is Google Content Blocker?

Google's mission is to organize the world's advertising for maximum exposure to Web users. Unfortunately, annoying Web content often overwhelms the page, causing many users to become distracted and overlook the ads.

That's where Google Content Blocker comes in. It effectively blocks all Web site content, leaving only the advertisements.

How does Google Content Blocker work?

After you install Google Content Block, just surf the Web as you normally do. When we find a site that has content, we will block that content so you see only the ads. It all happens automatically, with no effort on your part. ...

Frequently Asked Questions

1. How does Google Content Blocker work?


You're probably too dumb to understand the technicalities, but we'll tell you anyway. We install special top-secret proprietary software on your system. When you browser to a Web site, this software examines the document. Ads are displayed, and everything else is hidden.3. What type of Web content is blocked?

How many times do we have to tell you? Everything is blocked except the ads. It's not rocket science. One more time. Repeat after me: If it's an ad, it's not blocked. If it's not an ad, it's blocked. Got that? ...

5. What if I click on a page that has no ads?

A Web site with no ads? What do you think this is, 1991? The chances of that happening are very small. In such a case, we will insert some randomly selected Google AdSense ads so you'll have something to read. ...

(Thanks to John Walkenbach of Tucson, Arizona)

30 comments:

L-girl said...

A Web site with no ads? What do you think this is, 1991?

Stay strong! Stay free!

Jeremy said...

in all the years since I started using Firefox (now Chrome) I haven't seen more than a handful of ads unless it is a brand new install and I have yet to install an ad blocker. If the sites want to come after me for "not paying for their content" I would remind them that I send people to their sites and those people usually don't use an as blocker. They also wouldn't have much of a case since the computer is mine and I can do what I want with the browser of my choice, including blocking their annoying ads. I could also block them using a .hosts file, which is also within my right to do. Not a damn thing they can do about it either (except host their own ads on their production web servers, which I don't see happening anytime soon)

L-girl said...

FAQ # 7:

I'm an advertiser. How can I get more people to use this valuable tool?

Google has established business relationships with some of the leading spyware companies. Our partners are working diligently to patch their software so Google Content Blocker is installed automatically. Within 4-6 months, 92% of all computers in the world will have Google Content Blocker installed. Then, for all intents and purposes, the Web will be completely content-free.

L-girl said...

In all the years since I started using Firefox (now Chrome) I haven't seen more than a handful of ads unless it is a brand new install and I have yet to install an ad blocker.

Would you mind elaborating on this? How is it you don't see ads?

It can't have anything to do with Firefox or Chrome. The ads are on the websites. If you go to the sites, you see the ads. No?

redsock said...

All hail John Walkenbach of Tucson, Arizona!!!!

Amy said...

Pretty humorous stuff! I did not click on the link first time through and thought it was Allan's take on a real product.

The trademark lawyer in me then starts thinking,"Is this trademark infringement? They copied the actual Google logo, etc., and some people might really be confused and think this is a real product? But then any fool should realize it's a parody, right? Well, I didn't at first, and I am no fool. Hmm, maybe I am??"

Perhaps Jeremy is referring to POP-UP ads? I don't see how you can block ads on web pages. Sort of like trying to listen to a ball game and not hear all the plugs by the announcers!

L-girl said...

It's very well done. I imagine most people think it's a real product at first.

It probably is copyright infringement, but internet parody is rife with such infringement. It's a fact of life these days. Google wants to be "not evil," and it's a tribute to their ubiquity, so they are unlikely to do anything about it.

I wondered if Jeremy was referring to pop-up ads, too. Those are such a tiny percentage of the advertising on the internet. I'm quite curious how someone could say "I haven't seen more than a handful of ads". I would pay for that secret.

redsock said...

I added a note at the end of the post that hopefully will clear things up a bit.

Also: On the bottom of some of the pages, the first two links (Home and About Google) go to the actual Google while the third one goes to the fake privacy policy. (Which is likely quite close to the truth.)

Interestingly, the adsense examples go to Google's adsense page. Plus, he has ads (or one, maybe two) on his blog.

redsock said...

I'm quite curious how someone could say "I haven't seen more than a handful of ads". I would pay for that secret.

A year or two ago, some SoSHers were talking about something that supposedly eliminated all the ads from ESPN's website. Could it have been a browser? I cannot remember.

Amy said...

Hate to be a pain in the ass, but the copyright/trademark distinction is something I teach about, so I can't resist the urge to comment here.

Not to be overly lawyerly about it, but I see more trademark issues than copyright issues. I assume the creator did not copy any real text from Google. S/he may have copied the logo and the name Google and some of the way Google sets up a page. The logo and name raise trademark issues, though the layout may trigger some copyright issues. Also if s/he copied the actual code used by Google to create its logo and page setup, that could raise copyright issues. But mostly I think it's a trademark issue---that readers will be confused into thinking that this is a real Google product.

Fortunately, both trademark law and copyright law give some leeway to parodists, so presumably there wouldn't be any liability IF Google sued. And Google probably will just find it funny and not both to take any kind of action at all, as you suggest.

L-girl said...

I actually meant trademark, just used the wrong word.

Amy said...

You mean I didn't have to be so pedantic after all?? :)

I knew you would know the difference!

L-girl said...

Hey, you never know who's reading. Pedantry is never wasted.

All hail John Walkenbach of Tucson, Arizona!!!!

He's great: The J-Walk Blog.

Benjamin said...

It can't have anything to do with Firefox or Chrome. The ads are on the websites. If you go to the sites, you see the ads. No?

No. Ads are usually served either from completely different domains (like yieldmanager.com), or from particular subdomains (ads.cnn.com) or subdirectories (/pageads/). You can block them with plugins like Adblock Plus. Your browser doesn't load them, and you never see them.

Amy said...

Benjamin, you have been holding out on us all this time! I am always afraid to download stuff on my computer, but this may be worthwhile!

Benjamin said...

For instance, here's what ESPN looks like with ads blocked in Firefox using Adblock Plus, versus in IE without any blocking.

L-girl said...

Benjamin, I thought Jeremy was saying he has this result without any ad-blockers. Perhaps he is not including a plug-in as an ad-blocker.

Amy, why are you afraid to download stuff? And more importantly, how does one live without downloading?

L-girl said...

For instance, here's what ESPN looks like with ads blocked in Firefox using Adblock Plus, versus in IE without any blocking.

But you can use Firefox - as I do - without the ad-blocking plug-in. Using Firefox per se is not enough to block ads - you need Firefox plus an ad-blocker. That's what I was trying to say before.

I tried that plug-in a while back and everything took 10 times as long to load. Maybe it's improved and I should try again.

Amy said...

Oh, I download some stuff, but I am just careful. Sometimes I download it first at work, figuring if it screws up the work computer, someone will fix the problem. I am mostly concerned with hidden viruses and programs that affect the workings of my computer. I actually have very few programs on my computer other than the bare necessity: browsers, Office, Picasa, Adobe, etc. I mostly use my computer to browse and send email, so what more do I need?

I just am not very trusting, what can I say?

Amy said...

And I never knew there WERE ad blockers til now! I knew of pop-up ad blockers, but not blockers that strip ads from web pages.

But if it slows things down, forget it! I am not patient enough to wait ten minutes....sounds like the old dial-up days.

Benjamin said...

Jeremy said he only sees ads when he hasn't installed an ad blocker yet, so I assume he's installing one.

Like Jeremy alluded to, you can block many ads without a blocker plugin by using a hosts file -- you can essentially forget what certain domain names mean, particularly the ones that serve ads (like doubleclick.net, yieldmanager.com, etc.). Your browser then won't load those images, because it won't know where to look to retrieve them.

Allan is probably referring to a hosts file distributed by someone on SoSH, with a list of ESPN domain names to block.

Benjamin said...

*"you can essentially train your computer to forget"

Benjamin said...

Web pages don't load any more slowly on my computers when using an ad blocker. Give it a shot.

L-girl said...

Benjamin, I will try it again, in between terms when I have time. It might have been an early version, or maybe there was some other complication. Thanks!

Amy, I'm not sure trusting has anything to do with it, maybe relative comfort level with technology.

Anytime you save a pic or a pdf, you're downloading something. There are lots of apps you might need, too - like anti-virus software, or software that finds spyware, updates and new versions of apps you use - even some little useful tool like the Flickr uploader. (I know you use Picasa, not Flickr, but it's the same idea.)

It's pretty basic - not really scary stuff.

L-girl said...

Jeremy said he only sees ads when he hasn't installed an ad blocker yet, so I assume he's installing one.

Right, I read that incorrectly (duh). I thought he meant he didn't see ads simply because he uses Firefox or Chrome, which totally didn't make sense to me. Good thing other JoSers have better reading comprehension skills than me!

Right now I feel like I might be able to understand Little House on the Prairie, or maybe Curious George. Nothing as challenging as Charlotte's Web or A Wrinkle in Time.

Amy said...

I am sure I am downloading stuff all the time. I certainly update the software on my computer and add various plug ins when recommended by reliable sources. I just meant I don't download lots of big programs nor do I download lots of music, games or movies like lots of people.

L-girl said...

Right, I see what you mean.

I look forward to giving the ad blocker another try. If only there was a Giant Life Ad Blocker. I could install it in my brain so I wouldn't see billboards, corporate logos on everyfuckingthing, buses and trains wrapped in ads, ads on pitch counts, etc. etc. etc.

Amy said...

Yes, I was thinking that you would love something like that.

I used to detest the pop-up ads, but those are mostly gone. I can pretty much ignore the ads that surround my gmail, appear on the Google search page, the Facebook page, and all the other websites. I don't like them, but I can't say they bother me much.

I love DVRing---I barely ever have to watch ads on TV any more except when watching something live, like baseball. Even then, I usually use that time to get food, go to the bathroom, read something in the paper or type on the game threads!

Jeremy said...

Sorry I wasn't more clear. :(

I used AdBlock Plus on Firefox and Adblock for Chrome. Its an addon you can get from the addon portals for both browsers. https://chrome.google.com/extensions/
https://addons.mozilla.org/

When they install, they load a list of known ad serving hosts. Since they are generally not the same as the host your content is coming from, the ads aren't shown.

Its great for most sites, but some video sites I have to turn it on, but thats for interstitials, not display ads.

L-girl said...

Sorry I wasn't more clear.

You were probably crystal clear. My brain is a bit fried these days, I misread your comment.

But at least my poor reading skills started a good discussion! ;)